Foyer

A grand entrance to the prestigious estate, this staircase was added during the 1930 upgrade and expansion by Frank Kistler. The stairway to the second floor was originally a simple affair along the south wall of the first home and connected the kitchen with the upstairs bedrooms. This wall now divides the main hallway and the Great Hall. A shadow of this stairway was found during the renovation.

A standard in European estate homes and castles for centuries, a turret would have provided a lookout point with 360° views of the countryside. Featured in the photograph of John Springer’s “castle” around 1900, the turret was not the entry into his home at that time. The entrances into the home were located in the east porch in its current locations and a more formal doorway in the center of the Living Room, which is now a large window. The turret, with its angles orientation was cut into the existing structure, rising up through the original master bedroom. Access to the upper levels of the turret at that time is unknown, possibly with an outside ladder from the flat roof of the castle. When the pitched roof with shingles was added in 1930, a room, accessible only through the attic was added.

Foyer

The turret is constructed of Castle Rock rhyolite, a very popular stone for large structures, known for its rose color and attractive faceted surface. This is the only part of the current mansion that has rhyolite as a building material. Note the change in materials on both sides of the exterior of the turret as it was “stitched” into the existing building. The top of the turret was also modified in the 1930 expansion by Frank Kistler, for reasons unknown. The grand doorway that now greets visitors and invites them into the Mansion was added by Frank Kistler to complement the grand staircase.

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